Dickinson Week Day Two: “The Soul selects her own Society —”

The Soul selects her own Society —
Then — shuts the Door —
To her divine Majority —
Present no more —

Unmoved — she notes the Chariots —pausing —
At her low Gate —
Unmoved — an Emperor be kneeling
Upon her Mat —

I’ve known her — from an ample nation —
Choose One—
Then — close the Valves of her attention —
Like Stone—

Now this Dickinson poem seems to paint an extremely ritualised portrait of ‘The Soul’ and its self-determination. “The Soul selects her own Society —” ultimately illustrates the process of ‘The Soul’ choosing ‘her own society’, ‘society’ most likely referring to an intimate group of friends and family whom this particular ‘Soul’ wants to keep close. In describing the soul’s process of ‘selecting’ this ‘society’ as heavily ritualised, the poem becomes clad with a ceremonial tone which is further intensified through Dickinson’s reference in the second stanza to ‘an Emperor…kneeling / Upon her Mat.’ This reference to royalty and prayer and their respective connotations of faith and submission along with other references to ‘divinity’ and the idea of a ‘Chosen One’ fundamentally suggests the power and self-determination of ‘The Soul’ (which as I discussed in my previous post displays a further use of capitalisation on the part of Dickinson). The image that is conjured by the reader, of ‘The Soul’ surrounding ‘herself’ with a select few people and then the ceremonious shutting of the ‘Door’ and  the closing of ‘the Valves of her attention’, to me, really serves to highlight the intimacy of the soul and also its exclusivity.

If we look at the poem with a fresh pair of eyes it also could be argued to be a romantic poem, illustrating the soul’s search for her mate. The final stanza and Dickinson’s allusion to the ‘Chosen One’  seems to suggest a certain level of exclusivity to the ‘One’ who is chosen to have an intimate connection to the ‘Soul’ and fundamentally seems to correlate to the traditional idea of a ‘soul mate’ as each person’s partner for life. Dickinson ultimately seems to champion monogamy in this poem, depicting the finalised nature of finding a soul mate; finding them ‘close[s] the Valves of her attention’ to anything or anyone else around, which both suggests traditional monogamous romance and also possibly a danger. If the soul’s ‘Valves’ of attention are blocked and closed, this may possibly allude to Dickinson’s preoccupation with the ability to ‘see’ in her poetry, which to her serves as a metaphor for living. If the Soul’s entire attention is focused on her lover alone, then ‘she’ will arguably be blind to all other things, she will ‘see’ and thus live solely through her lover and without this, ‘sight’ will ultimately be lost, thus implicating death.

Emily Dickinson (1830-1886)

Emily Dickinson (1830-1886)

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